New York Bar Bans Customers Who Say ‘Literally’


Continental, an East Village dive bar famous for selling five shots “of anything” for $10, has decided to take a bold stand against the word “literally,” of all things. According to a sign posted in the bar’s window, the staff will boot anybody who uses the word “literally” from the premises, on the grounds that it is “annoying” and they just won’t tolerate ungrammatical language in the dive bar.

Continental has occupied its famous space near St. Marks’ Place for 27 years, and in its heyday was known for hosting acts like The Ramones and Iggy Pop. More recently it’s been known for its shots deal and $2 beer offers. Continental has filed for bankruptcy twice and is scheduled to close for good on June 30, 2018, but for the last few months of its existence, the grimy dive bar could be a haven for those who cannot stand to hear people say the word “literally.” According to a sign in the bar’s window, it will be kicking out any customers who commit that grammatical faux pas.

According to Grub Street, the sign was spotted by musician Eden Brower and shared with the East Village blog EV Grieve.

According to the sign, customers who say the word “literally” inside Continental will be given five minutes to finish their drink, and then they must go. A customer who begins a sentence with “I literally,” will be required to leave immediately.

“This is the most overused, annoying word in the English language and we will not tolerate it,” the note reads. “Stop Kardashianism now!”

The primary meaning of the word “literally” is to say that something actually happened. In informal speech, however, the word “literally” is often used as an exaggeration designed to emphasize something, according to the Merriam-Webster dictionary. A person might say, “I literally died of shock when they kicked me out of the bar for saying ‘literally,’” for example. It’s similar to the way a person might say, “I’ve been waiting a million years for my drink.”

Owner Trigger Smith told Time Out New York the sign was mostly a joke and he did not actually intend to enforce it, because the bar would be empty if he did. He really does hate the widespread use of the word “literally,” though. For more controversy, check out the 17 most controversial travel incidents of 2017.


De Blasio suggests NY may be skewing COVID data for ‘political’ considerations

Mayor Bill de Blasio on Wednesday suggested that scandal-scarred Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s administration may be skewing New York City’s COVID-19 data for political reasons.

“The state of New York has their own methodology [in calculating coronavirus statistics], and we don’t always agree that it’s the most rigorous methodology,” de Blasio said during a City Hall press briefing.

“Sometimes I am concerned that it might be a more subjective methodology, or there might be political considerations in the data,” said the mayor, adding, “We want the data to tell us the whole truth. We want to be led by the data and science.”

The Big Apple’s coronavirus positivity rate on a seven-day rolling average has consistently differed between city versus state data.

City data shows that New York City’s COVID-19 positivity rate has remained above 6 percent for weeks, but recent state data says that it’s been hovering at around 4 percent.

Hizzoner claimed that the city’s Department of Health, which tracks Big Apple COVID-19 data, “is the most accurate read of what’s happening in New York City.”

“We’re going to stick by it, because if we have the facts, we can protect our people, but we’re not going to depend on anyone else to understand the facts of New York City. We’ll do that for ourselves,” de Blasio said.

A patient being brought to a hospital in Brooklyn on January 27, 2021. Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images

When directly asked by a reporter whether he believes Cuomo or the state Health Department is “cooking the numbers,” de Blasio replied: “I would say I believe our numbers are more accurate and more consistent, and I know our numbers are based on objective science and I can’t say that about the state.”

Dr. Dave Chokshi, the city health commissioner, however said that though some city and state COVID-19 data differ, the trends remain similar.

“When we look at the trends, you know, with respect to cases, percent positivity, hospitalizations, those are the things that are most important to follow. And you know, despite some of the nuances and the differences between the data, those trends often tell a very similar story,” Chokshi said.

De Blasio’s dig at his longtime foe comes as Cuomo faces dueling scandals over sexual harassment allegations and questions over his administration’s handling of COVID-19 in nursing homes.

A crowd of people walking in Manhattan on January 5, 2021. Photo by ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images

During the briefing, de Blasio again called for Cuomo to step down over the allegations.

“I think he should resign so we can move forward in this state, but I’m not expecting him to do that today. So, the next thing he should do is resume normal democracy, restore democracy in the state of New York, restore local control so we can move forward,” de Blasio said.

De Blasio continued, “I am concerned that some of the decisions he’s made lately, I think, are more and more about politics than about the health of our people.”

“Well, the way to resolve that is to restore local control,” he said.

Cuomo spokesman Jack Sterne responded to de Blasio’s comments in a statement to The Post, saying, “We’ve been over this countless times with members of the media and City Hall, and while the State and City do report data differently, the implication that politics – not policy – drives this variance is irresponsible at best.”

“To be clear: this data is used to make critical decisions about business closures and reopenings, so we made the decision early on to report test results by the day they are returned, which produces a solid number each day. On the other hand, the City’s figures are reported as ‘incomplete,’ and change multiple times for days on end – it’s laughable the Mayor thinks the City’s data, which literally changes by the hour, is more accurate, consistent, or objective,” Sterne said.


De Blasio suggests NY may be skewing COVID data for ‘political’ considerations

Mayor Bill de Blasio on Wednesday suggested that scandal-scarred Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s administration may be skewing New York City’s COVID-19 data for political reasons.

“The state of New York has their own methodology [in calculating coronavirus statistics], and we don’t always agree that it’s the most rigorous methodology,” de Blasio said during a City Hall press briefing.

“Sometimes I am concerned that it might be a more subjective methodology, or there might be political considerations in the data,” said the mayor, adding, “We want the data to tell us the whole truth. We want to be led by the data and science.”

The Big Apple’s coronavirus positivity rate on a seven-day rolling average has consistently differed between city versus state data.

City data shows that New York City’s COVID-19 positivity rate has remained above 6 percent for weeks, but recent state data says that it’s been hovering at around 4 percent.

Hizzoner claimed that the city’s Department of Health, which tracks Big Apple COVID-19 data, “is the most accurate read of what’s happening in New York City.”

“We’re going to stick by it, because if we have the facts, we can protect our people, but we’re not going to depend on anyone else to understand the facts of New York City. We’ll do that for ourselves,” de Blasio said.

A patient being brought to a hospital in Brooklyn on January 27, 2021. Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images

When directly asked by a reporter whether he believes Cuomo or the state Health Department is “cooking the numbers,” de Blasio replied: “I would say I believe our numbers are more accurate and more consistent, and I know our numbers are based on objective science and I can’t say that about the state.”

Dr. Dave Chokshi, the city health commissioner, however said that though some city and state COVID-19 data differ, the trends remain similar.

“When we look at the trends, you know, with respect to cases, percent positivity, hospitalizations, those are the things that are most important to follow. And you know, despite some of the nuances and the differences between the data, those trends often tell a very similar story,” Chokshi said.

De Blasio’s dig at his longtime foe comes as Cuomo faces dueling scandals over sexual harassment allegations and questions over his administration’s handling of COVID-19 in nursing homes.

A crowd of people walking in Manhattan on January 5, 2021. Photo by ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images

During the briefing, de Blasio again called for Cuomo to step down over the allegations.

“I think he should resign so we can move forward in this state, but I’m not expecting him to do that today. So, the next thing he should do is resume normal democracy, restore democracy in the state of New York, restore local control so we can move forward,” de Blasio said.

De Blasio continued, “I am concerned that some of the decisions he’s made lately, I think, are more and more about politics than about the health of our people.”

“Well, the way to resolve that is to restore local control,” he said.

Cuomo spokesman Jack Sterne responded to de Blasio’s comments in a statement to The Post, saying, “We’ve been over this countless times with members of the media and City Hall, and while the State and City do report data differently, the implication that politics – not policy – drives this variance is irresponsible at best.”

“To be clear: this data is used to make critical decisions about business closures and reopenings, so we made the decision early on to report test results by the day they are returned, which produces a solid number each day. On the other hand, the City’s figures are reported as ‘incomplete,’ and change multiple times for days on end – it’s laughable the Mayor thinks the City’s data, which literally changes by the hour, is more accurate, consistent, or objective,” Sterne said.


De Blasio suggests NY may be skewing COVID data for ‘political’ considerations

Mayor Bill de Blasio on Wednesday suggested that scandal-scarred Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s administration may be skewing New York City’s COVID-19 data for political reasons.

“The state of New York has their own methodology [in calculating coronavirus statistics], and we don’t always agree that it’s the most rigorous methodology,” de Blasio said during a City Hall press briefing.

“Sometimes I am concerned that it might be a more subjective methodology, or there might be political considerations in the data,” said the mayor, adding, “We want the data to tell us the whole truth. We want to be led by the data and science.”

The Big Apple’s coronavirus positivity rate on a seven-day rolling average has consistently differed between city versus state data.

City data shows that New York City’s COVID-19 positivity rate has remained above 6 percent for weeks, but recent state data says that it’s been hovering at around 4 percent.

Hizzoner claimed that the city’s Department of Health, which tracks Big Apple COVID-19 data, “is the most accurate read of what’s happening in New York City.”

“We’re going to stick by it, because if we have the facts, we can protect our people, but we’re not going to depend on anyone else to understand the facts of New York City. We’ll do that for ourselves,” de Blasio said.

A patient being brought to a hospital in Brooklyn on January 27, 2021. Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images

When directly asked by a reporter whether he believes Cuomo or the state Health Department is “cooking the numbers,” de Blasio replied: “I would say I believe our numbers are more accurate and more consistent, and I know our numbers are based on objective science and I can’t say that about the state.”

Dr. Dave Chokshi, the city health commissioner, however said that though some city and state COVID-19 data differ, the trends remain similar.

“When we look at the trends, you know, with respect to cases, percent positivity, hospitalizations, those are the things that are most important to follow. And you know, despite some of the nuances and the differences between the data, those trends often tell a very similar story,” Chokshi said.

De Blasio’s dig at his longtime foe comes as Cuomo faces dueling scandals over sexual harassment allegations and questions over his administration’s handling of COVID-19 in nursing homes.

A crowd of people walking in Manhattan on January 5, 2021. Photo by ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images

During the briefing, de Blasio again called for Cuomo to step down over the allegations.

“I think he should resign so we can move forward in this state, but I’m not expecting him to do that today. So, the next thing he should do is resume normal democracy, restore democracy in the state of New York, restore local control so we can move forward,” de Blasio said.

De Blasio continued, “I am concerned that some of the decisions he’s made lately, I think, are more and more about politics than about the health of our people.”

“Well, the way to resolve that is to restore local control,” he said.

Cuomo spokesman Jack Sterne responded to de Blasio’s comments in a statement to The Post, saying, “We’ve been over this countless times with members of the media and City Hall, and while the State and City do report data differently, the implication that politics – not policy – drives this variance is irresponsible at best.”

“To be clear: this data is used to make critical decisions about business closures and reopenings, so we made the decision early on to report test results by the day they are returned, which produces a solid number each day. On the other hand, the City’s figures are reported as ‘incomplete,’ and change multiple times for days on end – it’s laughable the Mayor thinks the City’s data, which literally changes by the hour, is more accurate, consistent, or objective,” Sterne said.


De Blasio suggests NY may be skewing COVID data for ‘political’ considerations

Mayor Bill de Blasio on Wednesday suggested that scandal-scarred Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s administration may be skewing New York City’s COVID-19 data for political reasons.

“The state of New York has their own methodology [in calculating coronavirus statistics], and we don’t always agree that it’s the most rigorous methodology,” de Blasio said during a City Hall press briefing.

“Sometimes I am concerned that it might be a more subjective methodology, or there might be political considerations in the data,” said the mayor, adding, “We want the data to tell us the whole truth. We want to be led by the data and science.”

The Big Apple’s coronavirus positivity rate on a seven-day rolling average has consistently differed between city versus state data.

City data shows that New York City’s COVID-19 positivity rate has remained above 6 percent for weeks, but recent state data says that it’s been hovering at around 4 percent.

Hizzoner claimed that the city’s Department of Health, which tracks Big Apple COVID-19 data, “is the most accurate read of what’s happening in New York City.”

“We’re going to stick by it, because if we have the facts, we can protect our people, but we’re not going to depend on anyone else to understand the facts of New York City. We’ll do that for ourselves,” de Blasio said.

A patient being brought to a hospital in Brooklyn on January 27, 2021. Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images

When directly asked by a reporter whether he believes Cuomo or the state Health Department is “cooking the numbers,” de Blasio replied: “I would say I believe our numbers are more accurate and more consistent, and I know our numbers are based on objective science and I can’t say that about the state.”

Dr. Dave Chokshi, the city health commissioner, however said that though some city and state COVID-19 data differ, the trends remain similar.

“When we look at the trends, you know, with respect to cases, percent positivity, hospitalizations, those are the things that are most important to follow. And you know, despite some of the nuances and the differences between the data, those trends often tell a very similar story,” Chokshi said.

De Blasio’s dig at his longtime foe comes as Cuomo faces dueling scandals over sexual harassment allegations and questions over his administration’s handling of COVID-19 in nursing homes.

A crowd of people walking in Manhattan on January 5, 2021. Photo by ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images

During the briefing, de Blasio again called for Cuomo to step down over the allegations.

“I think he should resign so we can move forward in this state, but I’m not expecting him to do that today. So, the next thing he should do is resume normal democracy, restore democracy in the state of New York, restore local control so we can move forward,” de Blasio said.

De Blasio continued, “I am concerned that some of the decisions he’s made lately, I think, are more and more about politics than about the health of our people.”

“Well, the way to resolve that is to restore local control,” he said.

Cuomo spokesman Jack Sterne responded to de Blasio’s comments in a statement to The Post, saying, “We’ve been over this countless times with members of the media and City Hall, and while the State and City do report data differently, the implication that politics – not policy – drives this variance is irresponsible at best.”

“To be clear: this data is used to make critical decisions about business closures and reopenings, so we made the decision early on to report test results by the day they are returned, which produces a solid number each day. On the other hand, the City’s figures are reported as ‘incomplete,’ and change multiple times for days on end – it’s laughable the Mayor thinks the City’s data, which literally changes by the hour, is more accurate, consistent, or objective,” Sterne said.


De Blasio suggests NY may be skewing COVID data for ‘political’ considerations

Mayor Bill de Blasio on Wednesday suggested that scandal-scarred Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s administration may be skewing New York City’s COVID-19 data for political reasons.

“The state of New York has their own methodology [in calculating coronavirus statistics], and we don’t always agree that it’s the most rigorous methodology,” de Blasio said during a City Hall press briefing.

“Sometimes I am concerned that it might be a more subjective methodology, or there might be political considerations in the data,” said the mayor, adding, “We want the data to tell us the whole truth. We want to be led by the data and science.”

The Big Apple’s coronavirus positivity rate on a seven-day rolling average has consistently differed between city versus state data.

City data shows that New York City’s COVID-19 positivity rate has remained above 6 percent for weeks, but recent state data says that it’s been hovering at around 4 percent.

Hizzoner claimed that the city’s Department of Health, which tracks Big Apple COVID-19 data, “is the most accurate read of what’s happening in New York City.”

“We’re going to stick by it, because if we have the facts, we can protect our people, but we’re not going to depend on anyone else to understand the facts of New York City. We’ll do that for ourselves,” de Blasio said.

A patient being brought to a hospital in Brooklyn on January 27, 2021. Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images

When directly asked by a reporter whether he believes Cuomo or the state Health Department is “cooking the numbers,” de Blasio replied: “I would say I believe our numbers are more accurate and more consistent, and I know our numbers are based on objective science and I can’t say that about the state.”

Dr. Dave Chokshi, the city health commissioner, however said that though some city and state COVID-19 data differ, the trends remain similar.

“When we look at the trends, you know, with respect to cases, percent positivity, hospitalizations, those are the things that are most important to follow. And you know, despite some of the nuances and the differences between the data, those trends often tell a very similar story,” Chokshi said.

De Blasio’s dig at his longtime foe comes as Cuomo faces dueling scandals over sexual harassment allegations and questions over his administration’s handling of COVID-19 in nursing homes.

A crowd of people walking in Manhattan on January 5, 2021. Photo by ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images

During the briefing, de Blasio again called for Cuomo to step down over the allegations.

“I think he should resign so we can move forward in this state, but I’m not expecting him to do that today. So, the next thing he should do is resume normal democracy, restore democracy in the state of New York, restore local control so we can move forward,” de Blasio said.

De Blasio continued, “I am concerned that some of the decisions he’s made lately, I think, are more and more about politics than about the health of our people.”

“Well, the way to resolve that is to restore local control,” he said.

Cuomo spokesman Jack Sterne responded to de Blasio’s comments in a statement to The Post, saying, “We’ve been over this countless times with members of the media and City Hall, and while the State and City do report data differently, the implication that politics – not policy – drives this variance is irresponsible at best.”

“To be clear: this data is used to make critical decisions about business closures and reopenings, so we made the decision early on to report test results by the day they are returned, which produces a solid number each day. On the other hand, the City’s figures are reported as ‘incomplete,’ and change multiple times for days on end – it’s laughable the Mayor thinks the City’s data, which literally changes by the hour, is more accurate, consistent, or objective,” Sterne said.


De Blasio suggests NY may be skewing COVID data for ‘political’ considerations

Mayor Bill de Blasio on Wednesday suggested that scandal-scarred Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s administration may be skewing New York City’s COVID-19 data for political reasons.

“The state of New York has their own methodology [in calculating coronavirus statistics], and we don’t always agree that it’s the most rigorous methodology,” de Blasio said during a City Hall press briefing.

“Sometimes I am concerned that it might be a more subjective methodology, or there might be political considerations in the data,” said the mayor, adding, “We want the data to tell us the whole truth. We want to be led by the data and science.”

The Big Apple’s coronavirus positivity rate on a seven-day rolling average has consistently differed between city versus state data.

City data shows that New York City’s COVID-19 positivity rate has remained above 6 percent for weeks, but recent state data says that it’s been hovering at around 4 percent.

Hizzoner claimed that the city’s Department of Health, which tracks Big Apple COVID-19 data, “is the most accurate read of what’s happening in New York City.”

“We’re going to stick by it, because if we have the facts, we can protect our people, but we’re not going to depend on anyone else to understand the facts of New York City. We’ll do that for ourselves,” de Blasio said.

A patient being brought to a hospital in Brooklyn on January 27, 2021. Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images

When directly asked by a reporter whether he believes Cuomo or the state Health Department is “cooking the numbers,” de Blasio replied: “I would say I believe our numbers are more accurate and more consistent, and I know our numbers are based on objective science and I can’t say that about the state.”

Dr. Dave Chokshi, the city health commissioner, however said that though some city and state COVID-19 data differ, the trends remain similar.

“When we look at the trends, you know, with respect to cases, percent positivity, hospitalizations, those are the things that are most important to follow. And you know, despite some of the nuances and the differences between the data, those trends often tell a very similar story,” Chokshi said.

De Blasio’s dig at his longtime foe comes as Cuomo faces dueling scandals over sexual harassment allegations and questions over his administration’s handling of COVID-19 in nursing homes.

A crowd of people walking in Manhattan on January 5, 2021. Photo by ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images

During the briefing, de Blasio again called for Cuomo to step down over the allegations.

“I think he should resign so we can move forward in this state, but I’m not expecting him to do that today. So, the next thing he should do is resume normal democracy, restore democracy in the state of New York, restore local control so we can move forward,” de Blasio said.

De Blasio continued, “I am concerned that some of the decisions he’s made lately, I think, are more and more about politics than about the health of our people.”

“Well, the way to resolve that is to restore local control,” he said.

Cuomo spokesman Jack Sterne responded to de Blasio’s comments in a statement to The Post, saying, “We’ve been over this countless times with members of the media and City Hall, and while the State and City do report data differently, the implication that politics – not policy – drives this variance is irresponsible at best.”

“To be clear: this data is used to make critical decisions about business closures and reopenings, so we made the decision early on to report test results by the day they are returned, which produces a solid number each day. On the other hand, the City’s figures are reported as ‘incomplete,’ and change multiple times for days on end – it’s laughable the Mayor thinks the City’s data, which literally changes by the hour, is more accurate, consistent, or objective,” Sterne said.


De Blasio suggests NY may be skewing COVID data for ‘political’ considerations

Mayor Bill de Blasio on Wednesday suggested that scandal-scarred Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s administration may be skewing New York City’s COVID-19 data for political reasons.

“The state of New York has their own methodology [in calculating coronavirus statistics], and we don’t always agree that it’s the most rigorous methodology,” de Blasio said during a City Hall press briefing.

“Sometimes I am concerned that it might be a more subjective methodology, or there might be political considerations in the data,” said the mayor, adding, “We want the data to tell us the whole truth. We want to be led by the data and science.”

The Big Apple’s coronavirus positivity rate on a seven-day rolling average has consistently differed between city versus state data.

City data shows that New York City’s COVID-19 positivity rate has remained above 6 percent for weeks, but recent state data says that it’s been hovering at around 4 percent.

Hizzoner claimed that the city’s Department of Health, which tracks Big Apple COVID-19 data, “is the most accurate read of what’s happening in New York City.”

“We’re going to stick by it, because if we have the facts, we can protect our people, but we’re not going to depend on anyone else to understand the facts of New York City. We’ll do that for ourselves,” de Blasio said.

A patient being brought to a hospital in Brooklyn on January 27, 2021. Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images

When directly asked by a reporter whether he believes Cuomo or the state Health Department is “cooking the numbers,” de Blasio replied: “I would say I believe our numbers are more accurate and more consistent, and I know our numbers are based on objective science and I can’t say that about the state.”

Dr. Dave Chokshi, the city health commissioner, however said that though some city and state COVID-19 data differ, the trends remain similar.

“When we look at the trends, you know, with respect to cases, percent positivity, hospitalizations, those are the things that are most important to follow. And you know, despite some of the nuances and the differences between the data, those trends often tell a very similar story,” Chokshi said.

De Blasio’s dig at his longtime foe comes as Cuomo faces dueling scandals over sexual harassment allegations and questions over his administration’s handling of COVID-19 in nursing homes.

A crowd of people walking in Manhattan on January 5, 2021. Photo by ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images

During the briefing, de Blasio again called for Cuomo to step down over the allegations.

“I think he should resign so we can move forward in this state, but I’m not expecting him to do that today. So, the next thing he should do is resume normal democracy, restore democracy in the state of New York, restore local control so we can move forward,” de Blasio said.

De Blasio continued, “I am concerned that some of the decisions he’s made lately, I think, are more and more about politics than about the health of our people.”

“Well, the way to resolve that is to restore local control,” he said.

Cuomo spokesman Jack Sterne responded to de Blasio’s comments in a statement to The Post, saying, “We’ve been over this countless times with members of the media and City Hall, and while the State and City do report data differently, the implication that politics – not policy – drives this variance is irresponsible at best.”

“To be clear: this data is used to make critical decisions about business closures and reopenings, so we made the decision early on to report test results by the day they are returned, which produces a solid number each day. On the other hand, the City’s figures are reported as ‘incomplete,’ and change multiple times for days on end – it’s laughable the Mayor thinks the City’s data, which literally changes by the hour, is more accurate, consistent, or objective,” Sterne said.


De Blasio suggests NY may be skewing COVID data for ‘political’ considerations

Mayor Bill de Blasio on Wednesday suggested that scandal-scarred Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s administration may be skewing New York City’s COVID-19 data for political reasons.

“The state of New York has their own methodology [in calculating coronavirus statistics], and we don’t always agree that it’s the most rigorous methodology,” de Blasio said during a City Hall press briefing.

“Sometimes I am concerned that it might be a more subjective methodology, or there might be political considerations in the data,” said the mayor, adding, “We want the data to tell us the whole truth. We want to be led by the data and science.”

The Big Apple’s coronavirus positivity rate on a seven-day rolling average has consistently differed between city versus state data.

City data shows that New York City’s COVID-19 positivity rate has remained above 6 percent for weeks, but recent state data says that it’s been hovering at around 4 percent.

Hizzoner claimed that the city’s Department of Health, which tracks Big Apple COVID-19 data, “is the most accurate read of what’s happening in New York City.”

“We’re going to stick by it, because if we have the facts, we can protect our people, but we’re not going to depend on anyone else to understand the facts of New York City. We’ll do that for ourselves,” de Blasio said.

A patient being brought to a hospital in Brooklyn on January 27, 2021. Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images

When directly asked by a reporter whether he believes Cuomo or the state Health Department is “cooking the numbers,” de Blasio replied: “I would say I believe our numbers are more accurate and more consistent, and I know our numbers are based on objective science and I can’t say that about the state.”

Dr. Dave Chokshi, the city health commissioner, however said that though some city and state COVID-19 data differ, the trends remain similar.

“When we look at the trends, you know, with respect to cases, percent positivity, hospitalizations, those are the things that are most important to follow. And you know, despite some of the nuances and the differences between the data, those trends often tell a very similar story,” Chokshi said.

De Blasio’s dig at his longtime foe comes as Cuomo faces dueling scandals over sexual harassment allegations and questions over his administration’s handling of COVID-19 in nursing homes.

A crowd of people walking in Manhattan on January 5, 2021. Photo by ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images

During the briefing, de Blasio again called for Cuomo to step down over the allegations.

“I think he should resign so we can move forward in this state, but I’m not expecting him to do that today. So, the next thing he should do is resume normal democracy, restore democracy in the state of New York, restore local control so we can move forward,” de Blasio said.

De Blasio continued, “I am concerned that some of the decisions he’s made lately, I think, are more and more about politics than about the health of our people.”

“Well, the way to resolve that is to restore local control,” he said.

Cuomo spokesman Jack Sterne responded to de Blasio’s comments in a statement to The Post, saying, “We’ve been over this countless times with members of the media and City Hall, and while the State and City do report data differently, the implication that politics – not policy – drives this variance is irresponsible at best.”

“To be clear: this data is used to make critical decisions about business closures and reopenings, so we made the decision early on to report test results by the day they are returned, which produces a solid number each day. On the other hand, the City’s figures are reported as ‘incomplete,’ and change multiple times for days on end – it’s laughable the Mayor thinks the City’s data, which literally changes by the hour, is more accurate, consistent, or objective,” Sterne said.


De Blasio suggests NY may be skewing COVID data for ‘political’ considerations

Mayor Bill de Blasio on Wednesday suggested that scandal-scarred Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s administration may be skewing New York City’s COVID-19 data for political reasons.

“The state of New York has their own methodology [in calculating coronavirus statistics], and we don’t always agree that it’s the most rigorous methodology,” de Blasio said during a City Hall press briefing.

“Sometimes I am concerned that it might be a more subjective methodology, or there might be political considerations in the data,” said the mayor, adding, “We want the data to tell us the whole truth. We want to be led by the data and science.”

The Big Apple’s coronavirus positivity rate on a seven-day rolling average has consistently differed between city versus state data.

City data shows that New York City’s COVID-19 positivity rate has remained above 6 percent for weeks, but recent state data says that it’s been hovering at around 4 percent.

Hizzoner claimed that the city’s Department of Health, which tracks Big Apple COVID-19 data, “is the most accurate read of what’s happening in New York City.”

“We’re going to stick by it, because if we have the facts, we can protect our people, but we’re not going to depend on anyone else to understand the facts of New York City. We’ll do that for ourselves,” de Blasio said.

A patient being brought to a hospital in Brooklyn on January 27, 2021. Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images

When directly asked by a reporter whether he believes Cuomo or the state Health Department is “cooking the numbers,” de Blasio replied: “I would say I believe our numbers are more accurate and more consistent, and I know our numbers are based on objective science and I can’t say that about the state.”

Dr. Dave Chokshi, the city health commissioner, however said that though some city and state COVID-19 data differ, the trends remain similar.

“When we look at the trends, you know, with respect to cases, percent positivity, hospitalizations, those are the things that are most important to follow. And you know, despite some of the nuances and the differences between the data, those trends often tell a very similar story,” Chokshi said.

De Blasio’s dig at his longtime foe comes as Cuomo faces dueling scandals over sexual harassment allegations and questions over his administration’s handling of COVID-19 in nursing homes.

A crowd of people walking in Manhattan on January 5, 2021. Photo by ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images

During the briefing, de Blasio again called for Cuomo to step down over the allegations.

“I think he should resign so we can move forward in this state, but I’m not expecting him to do that today. So, the next thing he should do is resume normal democracy, restore democracy in the state of New York, restore local control so we can move forward,” de Blasio said.

De Blasio continued, “I am concerned that some of the decisions he’s made lately, I think, are more and more about politics than about the health of our people.”

“Well, the way to resolve that is to restore local control,” he said.

Cuomo spokesman Jack Sterne responded to de Blasio’s comments in a statement to The Post, saying, “We’ve been over this countless times with members of the media and City Hall, and while the State and City do report data differently, the implication that politics – not policy – drives this variance is irresponsible at best.”

“To be clear: this data is used to make critical decisions about business closures and reopenings, so we made the decision early on to report test results by the day they are returned, which produces a solid number each day. On the other hand, the City’s figures are reported as ‘incomplete,’ and change multiple times for days on end – it’s laughable the Mayor thinks the City’s data, which literally changes by the hour, is more accurate, consistent, or objective,” Sterne said.


De Blasio suggests NY may be skewing COVID data for ‘political’ considerations

Mayor Bill de Blasio on Wednesday suggested that scandal-scarred Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s administration may be skewing New York City’s COVID-19 data for political reasons.

“The state of New York has their own methodology [in calculating coronavirus statistics], and we don’t always agree that it’s the most rigorous methodology,” de Blasio said during a City Hall press briefing.

“Sometimes I am concerned that it might be a more subjective methodology, or there might be political considerations in the data,” said the mayor, adding, “We want the data to tell us the whole truth. We want to be led by the data and science.”

The Big Apple’s coronavirus positivity rate on a seven-day rolling average has consistently differed between city versus state data.

City data shows that New York City’s COVID-19 positivity rate has remained above 6 percent for weeks, but recent state data says that it’s been hovering at around 4 percent.

Hizzoner claimed that the city’s Department of Health, which tracks Big Apple COVID-19 data, “is the most accurate read of what’s happening in New York City.”

“We’re going to stick by it, because if we have the facts, we can protect our people, but we’re not going to depend on anyone else to understand the facts of New York City. We’ll do that for ourselves,” de Blasio said.

A patient being brought to a hospital in Brooklyn on January 27, 2021. Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images

When directly asked by a reporter whether he believes Cuomo or the state Health Department is “cooking the numbers,” de Blasio replied: “I would say I believe our numbers are more accurate and more consistent, and I know our numbers are based on objective science and I can’t say that about the state.”

Dr. Dave Chokshi, the city health commissioner, however said that though some city and state COVID-19 data differ, the trends remain similar.

“When we look at the trends, you know, with respect to cases, percent positivity, hospitalizations, those are the things that are most important to follow. And you know, despite some of the nuances and the differences between the data, those trends often tell a very similar story,” Chokshi said.

De Blasio’s dig at his longtime foe comes as Cuomo faces dueling scandals over sexual harassment allegations and questions over his administration’s handling of COVID-19 in nursing homes.

A crowd of people walking in Manhattan on January 5, 2021. Photo by ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images

During the briefing, de Blasio again called for Cuomo to step down over the allegations.

“I think he should resign so we can move forward in this state, but I’m not expecting him to do that today. So, the next thing he should do is resume normal democracy, restore democracy in the state of New York, restore local control so we can move forward,” de Blasio said.

De Blasio continued, “I am concerned that some of the decisions he’s made lately, I think, are more and more about politics than about the health of our people.”

“Well, the way to resolve that is to restore local control,” he said.

Cuomo spokesman Jack Sterne responded to de Blasio’s comments in a statement to The Post, saying, “We’ve been over this countless times with members of the media and City Hall, and while the State and City do report data differently, the implication that politics – not policy – drives this variance is irresponsible at best.”

“To be clear: this data is used to make critical decisions about business closures and reopenings, so we made the decision early on to report test results by the day they are returned, which produces a solid number each day. On the other hand, the City’s figures are reported as ‘incomplete,’ and change multiple times for days on end – it’s laughable the Mayor thinks the City’s data, which literally changes by the hour, is more accurate, consistent, or objective,” Sterne said.


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